New York State Learning Standards

(http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/nysatl/standards.html)

Social Studies Standard 4: Economics
Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms.

Mathematics, Science & Technology Standard 2: Information Systems
Students will access, generate, process, and transfer information using appropriate technologies.

Mathematics, Science & Technology Standard 5: Technology
Students will apply technological knowledge and skills to design, construct, use, and evaluate products and systems to satisfy human and environmental needs.

English Language Arts Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction
Students will listen, speak, read, and write for social interaction. Students will use oral and written language that follows the accepted conventions of the English language for effective social communication with a wide variety of people. As readers and listeners, they will use the social communications of others to enrich their understanding of people and their views.

Career Development and Occupational Studies Standard 2: Integrated Learning
Students will demonstrate how academic knowledge and skills are applied in the workplace and other settings



ACRL Information Literacy Standards for Science & Technology
(http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/infolitscitech.cfm)

1.3 Has a working knowledge of the literature of the field and how it is produced.

a. Knows how scientific, technical, and related information is formally and informally produced, organized, and disseminated.
b. Recognizes that primary, secondary, and tertiary sources vary in importance and use with each discipline.


3.1 The information literate student critically evaluates the procured information and its sources, and as a result, decides whether or not to modify the initial query and/or seek additional sources and whether to develop a new research process. Selects information by articulating and applying criteria for evaluating both the information and its sources.

a. Distinguishes between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources, and recognizes how location of the information source in the cycle of scientific information relates to the credibility of the information.
b. Distinguishes among facts, points of view, and opinion.
c. Examines and compares information from various sources in order to evaluate reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias.
f. .Recognizes prejudice, deception, or manipulation in the information or its use.
g. Recognizes the cultural, physical, or other context within which the information was created, and understands the impact of context on interpreting the information.


3.3 Synthesizes main ideas to construct new concepts.

a. Recognizes interrelationships among concepts and combines them into potentially useful primary statements and/or summary of findings with supporting evidence.


3.5 Validates understanding and interpretation of the information through discourse with other individuals, small groups or teams, subject-area experts, and/or practitioners.

a. Participates in classroom and virtual/electronic discussions (e.g., email, bulletin boards, chat rooms) and uses discussions for validating understanding and interpretation of the information.
b. Works effectively in small groups or teams.




ACRL Information Literacy Standards for Anthropology & Sociology
(http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/anthro_soc_standards.cfm)

1.3 Identify a variety of formats and sources in which anthropological and sociological information may appear.

a. Describes how information used in anthropology and sociology is formally and informally produced and disseminated.
b. Recognizes that anthropological and sociological knowledge is organized in certain ways and in various formats which may influence how it is accessed and evaluated.
c. Differentiates between primary and secondary sources in anthropology and sociology, recognizing the use and value of each type.
d. Recognizes that existing information can be combined with original thought, experimentation, and/or analysis to produce new information and insights into society, social phenomena, aspects of culture, and social theories.

3.1 Summarize the main ideas to be extracted from the information gathered and synthesize main ideas to construct new concepts.
a. Recognizes interrelationships among concepts, social theories, field observations, and other data and combines them into potentially useful primary statements with supporting evidence.
b. Utilizes technologies (such as audio or visual equipment, spreadsheets, and statistical and software packages) for studying the interaction of ideas and other phenomena.

3.2 Apply appropriate criteria for evaluating both the information and its source.
a. Examines and compares information from various sources in order to ascertain the reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias of a given source.
c. Seeks differing viewpoints in alternative databases, books, Web sites, and articles, always evaluating the source of the information or argument, and determines whether to incorporate or reject viewpoints encountered.
e. Recognizes the cultural, physical, or other context within which the information was created and accessed, and understands the impact of context on interpreting the information.